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An exhibition at Palmer Museum of Art

Introduction

The exhibition that I visited was the Palmer Museum of Art. It was a great experience because I enjoyed the entire process. It was my first time to visit the place, building my expectations to see wonderful arts (Penn state college of art and architecture, 2019). At the Palmer Museum of art situated on Penn State, I was carried away by the incredible paintings. One of the most incredible arts I saw was a painting of a Still Life with Strawberriesm by Richard La Barre Goodwin. At the museum, I also came across a painting of “The White Rose” by Martin Johnson Heade. Overall, the museum was a beautiful place to learn more about the world. In this paper, I will address my visit to an exhibition at the Palmer Museum of Art.

When one enters the Palmer Museum of Art at Penn State, there is an instant and significant change in the ambiance of the room. It is not like a big city museum, but it has some neat staff displayed excellently. I particularly enjoyed it since there were different paintings and old photography galleries. The main topic of the exhibition was the American still-life painting in the 19th century. The exhibition showed the rich tradition of still-life painting in the US with emphasis on Pennsylvania’s influential role in that history (Penn state college of art and architecture, 2019). The topic explored various themes such as from brevity of life, to the bounty of the continent and meaning of the common place.

At the Palmer Museum Art, there were no entrance charges, and the designs, as well as the layout of the arts, was very impressive and unique. Different paintings were on display, communicating the themes of the exhibition. When I arrived at the exhibition, groups by groups of people were entering the exhibition halls with their faces were radiant with joy. It was one of the most impressive exhibition. The paintings were displayed on exhibitions were attracting and brought an understanding of the idea behind the work. The paintings were visually engaging and clear hence appealing to the sight.

The viewers saw how Palmer explored how flowers, fruits, and simple household items transfixed from the 19th century to the present day. For example, painting of a Still Life with Strawberriesm by Richard La Barre Goodwin was very clear and distinct. The texts below the painting allowed the viewers to understand essential aspects such as the name of the painting as well as the author. The viewers also learned insight into the year of creation. For instance, painting of a Still Life with Strawberriesm was created in 1885.

Figure 1; Still Life with Strawberriesm by Richard La Barre Goodwin

Description: http://www.artfixdaily.com/images/c/62/cd/Aug21_labarre500x398.jpg

In addition, another painting that I saw was “The White Rose” by Martin Johnson Heade. It is one of the paintings done perfectly depicting inanimate objects amid the rising culture. The information provided beneath the art describes the name of the painting, as well as the author or creator. The viewers can see that the painting created between 1874 and 1880. However, there is no explanation of the message of the painting through the texts. Despite the lack of explanation on the paintings at a glance, the exhibition space provided more information for the viewers.

Figure 2; “The White Rose” by Martin Johnson Heade

Description: http://www.artfixdaily.com/images/c/5b/0a/aug21_heade500x607.jpg

Conclusion

My visit to an exhibition at the Palmer Museum of Art was interesting and educative. I was able to learn more about different still-life paintings. The exhibition explored different periods and styles in American artwork. It was relevant for understanding the development and cultural value of still-life painting created in the 19th century a time when the genre was well known. It was a remarkable way to remind people of the cultural concepts in the US. Therefore, the Palmer Museum of art plays a major role in promoting cultural heritage. 

Reference

Penn state college of art and architecture (2019). Palmer Museum of Art. Retrieved from; https://palmermuseum.psu.edu/visit

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